Hopkins Community Invited to Tour Pathology Labs

May 13th, 2016

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Behind-the-scenes tours of five Pathology laboratories at Johns Hopkins Hospital were offered during Lab Week to the Johns Hopkins Medicine community at large, an opportunity to learn about laboratory medicine and pathology — assays, methodologies, instruments, workflow and operations.

Tours were organized by educational coordinators Lorraine Blagg (Blood Bank), Karen Bordenet (Surgical Pathology), Christine Hostetter (Core Lab), and Paula Mister (Microbiology/Immunology). Departments were notified by email and through notices from InsideHopkins.

Nearly 40 people from various departments including Pediatrics, International, Hematology, Compliance, Ob/Gyn, Oncology, Public Relations, the Fund for JH Medicine, and Pathology, signed up for “pre-lunchtime” tours of the Blood Bank, Surgical Pathology-Grossing and Histology, the Core Lab, and the Microbiology/Immunology Labs. So many people enrolled for the Microbiology/Immunology and Surgical Pathology tours that it was necessary to divide groups into two. Ava Roberts assisted Paula Mister, and Katina Williams-Stewart helped Karen Bordenet with the “overflow.” A few additional tours of the Blood Bank and the Core Lab are planned in the near future.

Feedback from tour participants was overwhelmingly positive! Phil Sullivan of the HPTN LC Lab described his experience, “Whirlwind tours that were suitable for any background, and provided awareness for the depth and range of the clinical work performed within the Hopkins laboratories.” Dr. Fenghua Zhang, a visiting international scholar from China wrote, “I learned so much about lab techniques, and the people who led the tours were very nice and patient. I was impressed by many types of instruments which can conduct tests very efficiently.” Lingxia Sun, a Pediatrics dietician commented, “The tour was a great learning opportunity for me. It was very interesting to learn about the results we use daily—chemistries, cultures, etc.—where they come from, and how blood can get to patients who need transfusions.”

Please see below for pictures of these tours which were held the week of April 25, 2016.

Histopathology technician, Delroy Curtis explained how tissue samples are cut one cell-layer thick on a microtome.

Delroy Curtis, one of our histology technicians, explained how tissue samples are cut one cell-layer thick on a microtome.

 

Karen Bordenet demonstrated how the slides are initially stained for the pathologists to review.

Karen Bordenet demonstrated how the slides are initially stained for the pathologists to review.

 

Rebecca Gregory, pathologist assistant student from the University of Maryland, explained how the fresh tissue is grossed.

Rebecca Gregory, pathologist assistant student from the University of Maryland, explained how the fresh tissue is grossed.

 

Core Lab tour participants listened as Christine Hostetter gave an overview of the assays performed in the Special Chemistry area.

Core Lab tour participants listened as Christine Hostetter gave an overview of the assays performed in the Special Chemistry area.

 

Lania Quaccoo, a clinical laboratory scientist in Hematology, spent time with tour participants to explain her work with white cell differentials.

Lania Quaccoo, a clinical laboratory scientist in Hematology, spent time with tour participants to explain her work with white cell differentials.

 

A fun screensaver of a “smiling” white cell in the Hematology Lab.

A fun screensaver of a “smiling” white cell in the Hematology Lab.

 

Paula Mister briefed her tour participants before she escorted them to the Microbiology and Immunology Labs in the Meyer Basement.

 

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Ava Roberts explained how all specimens enter the Microbiology Lab at the processing area tube station.

 

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Ava described the technology of the new Walk Away Specimen Processing (WASP) instrument in the Micro Lab.

 

In the sample testing area, Lorraine explained the methodology of the Immucor NEO, an automated blood bank analyzer.

In the Blood Bank’s sample testing area, Lorraine Blagg explained the methodology of the Immucor NEO, an automated blood bank analyzer.

 

 

The Blood Bank’s refrigerator stores red blood cell units and is constantly monitored to ensure a quality product.

The Blood Bank’s refrigerator stores red blood cell units and is constantly monitored to ensure a quality product.

 

 

Lorraine discussed the blood dispensing machine which is also located in the Operating Rooms.

Lorraine discussed the blood dispensing machines which are located in the Operating Room suites.

Sincere thanks and recognition not only to the tour leaders, Paula, Ava, Karen, Katina, Lorraine and Chris, but to each and every one of our 650+ medical laboratory professionals for their unwavering dedication, service, and commitment to excellence and quality patient care throughout the year. Medical laboratory professionals are truly the unsung heroes of the medical profession.

 

Renata Karlos
Staff Assistant
Member, Continuing Education Committee
Department of Pathology
Johns Hopkins Hospital